UniSat-6 viewer of the solar eclipse: camera pointing at the Black Sun

This year’s Spring equinox will coincide with a great natural event: the Moon will cast its shadow on our planet when passing between the Sun and the Earth. On 20 March 2015 there will be a solar eclipse, total in some parts of the North of Europe, like the Faroe Islands and the Norwegian Svalbard, while it will be partial in most of Europe (even though with a high percentage), in North and East Asia and North and West Africa.

The phenomena will start at 07:41 UTC and will end at 11:50 UTC, being visible from various areas of the Earth at different moments.

G.A.U.S.S.’ satellite UniSat-6 will target the natural spectacle offered by the overlapping of the Sun and the Moon, trying to capture unique snapshots of the Moon’s shadow projected on the Earth with its integrated camera from its point of view on orbit.

UniSat-6 will pass at 1700 kilometers distance from the totality at around 10:05 UTC.

Solar eclipse March 2015 - Highlighted the position of UniSat-6 and the totality © Eclipse map courtesy of Fred Espenak, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
Solar eclipse March 2015 – Highlighted the position of UniSat-6 and the totality © Eclipse map courtesy of Fred Espenak, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related links

The Virtual Telescope will be streaming the eclipse:
http://www.virtualtelescope.eu/webtv/

Nasa website:
http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2015Mar20Tgoogle.html

 

 

Share this post!

1 comment on “UniSat-6 viewer of the solar eclipse: camera pointing at the Black Sun”

  1. Pingback: UniSat-6 witnessing the solar eclipse | Gaussteam

Comments are closed.